THE LOSS OF DAKOTA A65-2  

At the time of the accident there was much speculation about the loss of an engine, although the investigation team could find no evidence of any unserviceability with any of the aircraft systems.   Ultimately the investigation in 1943 cited error of judgement and poor technique on the part of the pilot as the cause.  Hopefully today we would not be so damning.  Final verdicts of pilot error are not acceptable anymore.   Pilots do not set out to crash aeroplanes so what happened to cause this crew to err.   In this case it could be a case of Spatial Disorientation, or as Bob Livingstone has suggested, caged Gyros, both of which can lead rapidly to loss of control.    In his defence, Flying Officer Arnold had only 121 hours on type of which a mere 14 hours were as captain.


At the time of the accident there was much speculation about the loss of an engine, although the investigation team could find no evidence of any unserviceability with any of the aircraft systems. Ultimately the investigation in 1943 cited error of judgement and poor technique on the part of the pilot as the cause. Hopefully today we would not be so damning. Final verdicts of pilot error are not acceptable anymore. Pilots do not set out to crash aeroplanes so what happened to cause this crew to err. In this case it could be a case of Spatial Disorientation, or as Bob Livingstone has suggested, caged Gyros, both of which can lead rapidly to loss of control. In his defence, Flying Officer Arnold had only 121 hours on type of which a mere 14 hours were as captain.


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