THE LOSS OF SPITFIRE VIIIs A58-392 and A58-393 


Flight Sergeant Chandler is buried next to his CO, Squadron Leader Wright in the War Graves section of the Lutwyche Cemetery.   Rather than the good Sergeant being forevermore - on the carpet - so to speak, I imagine their conversation would centre around the parentage of Red Leader, and the flaws in the procedures that allowed him to even consider such an un-briefed manoeuvre even in wartime.   There are some interesting statistics of training losses vs operational losses.

    Now days there are some very tight directives regarding the rules of engagement while training for combat, and yet collisions between aircraft during Air Combat Manoeuvres (ACM) and formation attack still happen.   The losses of Mirages A3-29 and A3-30, Macchis A7-038 and A7-088, Skyhawk N13-155055 (872) and also of Hornet A21-42, bear testimony to the difficulty of eradicating the dangers inherent in operating high performance aircraft in close proximity to one another.    

As an aside, Hornet A21-42 crashed at a location, that had for some time, been gazetted as Hornet Hill.  what are the odds?!


Once again I am indebted to Peter Dunn and his outstanding web site Australia at War, for information on this crash.   Peter attended the dedication of the Memorial in the Merv Ewart Reserve and has an excellent account of events on his site, accessible through the ADF-Serials links page.   The photo of the Spitfires in formation has been sourced from the RAAF Official Image historical database.

Flight Sergeant Chandler is buried next to his CO, Squadron Leader Wright in the War Graves section of the Lutwyche Cemetery. Rather than the good Sergeant being forevermore - on the carpet - so to speak, I imagine their conversation would centre around the parentage of Red Leader, and the flaws in the procedures that allowed him to even consider such an un-briefed manoeuvre even in wartime. There are some interesting statistics of training losses vs operational losses.

Now days there are some very tight directives regarding the rules of engagement while training for combat, and yet collisions between aircraft during Air Combat Manoeuvres (ACM) and formation attack still happen. The losses of Mirages A3-29 and A3-30, Macchis A7-038 and A7-088, Skyhawk N13-155055 (872) and also of Hornet A21-42, bear testimony to the difficulty of eradicating the dangers inherent in operating high performance aircraft in close proximity to one another.

As an aside, Hornet A21-42 crashed at a location, that had for some time, been gazetted as Hornet Hill. what are the odds?!


Once again I am indebted to Peter Dunn and his outstanding web site Australia at War, for information on this crash. Peter attended the dedication of the Memorial in the Merv Ewart Reserve and has an excellent account of events on his site, accessible through the ADF-Serials links page. The photo of the Spitfires in formation has been sourced from the RAAF Official Image historical database.

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